목록

Home

책표지

글로벌 인재 확보 경쟁에서 승리하기

모든 혁신은 사람으로부터 비롯된다. 미국의 성공은 이러한 혁신을 이민자로부터 공급받아왔기 때문이다. 그러나 이제는 미국뿐만 아니라 OECD 국가들 모두 글로벌 인재를 확보하기 위해 경..





Winning the Race for Global Talent

The industriousness of a nation’s people has always been a principal driver of economic vitality and a key ingredient in national competitiveness. As the global economy is growing more digital, we’re seeing a secular shift away from reliance upon tangible capital, including physical equipment & buildings, and toward intangible capital, meaning intellectual capital largely in the form of software and patents. Human talent is the primary source of these intangible assets, so talent is becoming increasingly important to economic growth and innovation.

At the same time, national security and national power depend more than ever on economic and technological success. Obviously, the weapons of war are becoming more dependent on cutting-edge technology. But more importantly, economic warfare has become the primary arena of international competition in the 21st century and the race for technological supremacy has become its most contested front.

High-end technological sectors, such as artificial intelligence, 5G and quantum science, can offer decisive benefits for the security and geopolitical positioning of any country that leads in their development. As a result, the nation that shapes the technologies and technology standards of the future will benefit enormously.

Highly skilled immigrants to the United States have excelled in scientific research for at least the past 100 years and continue to be disproportionately represented in STEM fields. In the process of innovating, high-skilled immigrants have embraced the country’s entrepreneurial spirit, starting businesses, including Fortune 500 powerhouses, at an astounding rate.

These immigrants have proven to be a major source of invention and innovation while making those around them more innovative. Today, immigrants represent roughly 14 percent of the U.S. population, up from around 7 percent in 1950. And relative to their share of the population this so-called “pool of global talent” consistently contributes disproportionately to scientific discovery in the United States. As a result, immigrants as a group dominate American research institutions and technical fields. For instance, since 1901, foreign born researchers have received one-third of the Nobel Prizes in chemistry, medicine, and physics awarded to residents of the United States. And they have been even more prevalent since 2000.

Furthermore, international students fill our STEM classrooms; for instance, two-thirds of graduate students in AI-related fields were born abroad. College-educated, foreign-born workers are also more likely than their native-born counterparts to be in employed in technology, science, or engineering occupations. In 2013, Matthew Slaughter, dean of the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth University, and Gordon Hanson, now at Harvard University, found that 60% of all U.S. workers with a STEM doctorate working in a STEM occupation were immigrants. And in the key STEM fields of computer science, computer programming and software development, over 50% of U.S. workers with a master’s degree were immigrants.

As a result, the United States depends more than ever on immigrants to advance scientific discovery and the technological research that make innovation possible!

Foreign-born entrepreneurs have also made outsize contributions to the highest levels of business. As of 2019, 20 percent of Fortune 500 companies were started by immigrants, with another 24 percent started by children of immigrants. From American icons such as Levi Strauss to Silicon Valley stalwarts such as Google, cofounded by Moscow-born Sergey Brin, these public companies span across sectors, and their headquarters dot the country.

Furthermore, immigrants have started 50 of the 91 privately held startups valued at over $1 billion which, in 2018, were collectively valued at $248 billion.

But it’s not just big companies to which immigrants have contributed their talents. The founders of 18 percent of small businesses nationwide were foreign-born. And while less-educated immigrants tend to be the most entrepreneurial, those with at least a college degree still start new businesses more often than their U.S.-born counterparts.

This prevalence of immigrants in STEM fields and in entrepreneurship has positioned immigrants as a critical source of invention and innovation throughout our nation’s history. From 1880 to 1940, the 10 most inventive states (measured by the number of patents filed) had nearly 12 times as many international migrants as the 10 least inventive states; they also had six times as many inventors per capita and had eight times as many patents per capita. From 1976 to 2012, according to scholars at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, immigrants accounted for 16 percent of inventors in America, 23 percent of new patents, and 30 percent of aggregate innovation.

The relationships between immigration and innovation are well established. As Harvard Business School Professor William Kerr observed, “Highskilled immigrants are clearly an essential piece of American innovation.” And they also boost the innovative output of their new American neighbors. In research for the George W. Bush Institute, Pia Orrenius, vice president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, determined that “greater innovation among immigrants appears to boost innovation among natives, too.”‘ The Stanford researchers cited earlier agree saying, “More than 2/3 of the contribution of immigrants to U.S. innovation has been due to the way in which immigrants make U.S. natives substantially more productive.”

This all means that skilled immigrants disproportionately drive scientific research, technological development, business building, and entrepreneurship, which are the building blocks of innovation. This pattern of immigrant supported innovation has been central to the U.S. economic makeup for over a century and this value exceeds mere economic measures.

Nowhere is that clearer than in the national response to the COVID19 pandemic. Highly skilled immigrants have leading roles in health care and biotechnology. And the medical professionals on the front line of treatment are disproportionately foreign-born. Furthermore, two of the companies that led development of the coronavirus vaccines-Moderna and Pfizer-were founded by immigrants.

What’s the bottom line? Because we’re increasingly dependent on knowledge-based workers and entrepreneurs, America needs to jealously guard and enhance its ability to attract and retain top global talent.

Looking ahead, the good news is that the worldwide pool of highly skilled immigrants is expanding. In the past three decades, the worldwide population of immigrants grew from 153 million to 272 million, while their education and skill levels have increased even faster. Specifically, from 2000 to 2015, the number of immigrants coming to OECD countries with at least a university level education increased by 20 million, while the number of lower-educated migrants increased by five million.

The bad news for America is that several other countries across the developed world have recognized the growing worldwide supply of talent and their own need to attract highly skilled immigrants. As a result, they have taken steps to attract a larger share of the top talent.

Those countries, which have long relied heavily on immigrants to supplement population growth, labor supply, and economic expansion, have recently modified their policies to attract more entrepreneurs as well as those with high-tech skills.

For instance, Canada recently incorporated a startup visa program that immediately provides eligibility for permanent residency to immigrants with funding for startups from Canadian venture capital firms or other investment groups.

In recent years, Australia has implemented new programs to attract global talent; these include programs encouraging individuals with entrepreneurial ideas and cutting-edge skills to apply for visas without employer sponsorship as well as programs which involve recruiting foreign entrepreneurs to launch seedstage startups.

Germany has also modified its already moderate immigration policies.

And even countries with historically restrictive policies, such as Japan and China, have relaxed their stances and overhauled their policies to support highly-skilled immigration.

In such a context, the United States cannot simply assume it will always get the elite human capital it needs to remain on top. Yet, despite this growing competition, administrations (of both parties) have failed to take meaningful steps to appeal to, support, and retain talented foreigners.

If anything, it has gone in the opposite direction. Progressives seem more interested in admitting future gardeners and food stamp recipients, while populists often confuse the implications of admitting engineers and computer scientists with those of admitting potential fast-food workers. As a result, during the Trump years, America implemented policies that made it more difficult for the most talented foreign workers and students to come to America and to stay in the country. And more recently, the restrictive immigration policies the Biden administration has pledged to undo mainly deal with low-skilled immigrants, qualified only to fill jobs for which a surplus of native-born Americans already possess the required skills. So far, the administration’s alleged compassion for future welfare recipients and minimum wage workers is apparent, but it’s unclear what, if anything, it will do to recruit the world’s “best and brightest” to the United States and to ensure that we retain them.

To fully understand this trend, it’s important to understand that America’s relative attractiveness to global talent is shaped by a host of factors, including

- global competition;
- U.S. immigration policy;
- broader domestic cultural trends; and
- domestic policies involving innovation, labor, and entrepreneurship.

Admittedly, these various dimensions defy comprehensive analysis, but even a cursory review of the evidence reveals worrying trends.

First, despite an increasing supply of applications by highly skilled immigrants, the caps on H-1B visas for educated and specialized workers and I-485 employment-based green cards have not changed significantly since 1990. After a brief spike in temporary workers, visa caps were set at 65,000 in 2004, and Congress approved 20,000 more visas for recipients of advanced degrees from U.S. universities. With these tight limits in place, denial rates for new and existing temporary work visas have grown in recent years, as have “denial” and “pending” statuses for immigrants seeking employment-based permanent residence. From 2015 to 2019, the denial rate for new H-1B visa applications jumped from roughly 6 percent to over 20 percent. The denial rate of petitions for continued employment also increased from 3 percent to nearly 12 percent. Green card applicants likewise saw petitions denied or delayed at far higher rates.

Second, policy and regulatory changes also appear to be making the visa and green card application processes more onerous. Processing times for employment-based green card applications more than doubled in the past four years, from 6.8 months to over 14. This surge in case-processing times has hurt businesses’ ability to hire and train workers, hindered international student enrollment in U.S. universities, and, more simply, made it more painful to come to, work in, and stay in America.

Third, the growing global competition for talent from other OECD countries coupled with high domestic barriers is diminishing the ability of American colleges and universities to attract the best international students. In 2019, most U.S. schools reported a decrease in new international students. This drop came on the heels of successive down years; new international enrollment fell by 3.3 percent in 2016, 6.6 percent in 2017, and 0.9 percent in 2018, according to the Institute of International Education. The pandemic further diminished international student arrivals, though the long-term impact of COVID-19 on recruitment and enrollment remains to be seen. All told, America’s share of international students has decreased in recent years, from 28 percent in 2001 to 21 percent in 2019.

Simultaneously, China’s share increased from 3 percent to 9 percent, while both Australia and Canada assumed more prominent positions.

Policy uncertainty and evidence of growing anti-immigrant sentiment, coupled with concrete rule changes to inhibit visa and green card approvals, have had a chilling effect. Leading technologists, executives, and academics worry the U.S. is becoming less competitive for talent. This is not to say America is about to lose its “pole position” in the global talent race. It still has the largest share of the worldwide international student population, with over one million international enrollments, and by all measures, it remains a top destination for those seeking work and opportunity.  However, there are clear warning signal that America’s big lead is fading.

This begs the question, “Are we doing all we can to sustain America’s winning team?”

The broader debate on immigration is rife with complex economic, security, political, and cultural considerations that have served as obstacles to consensus and progress. With regard to admitting high-skilled foreigners, the two biggest concerns are that

- they could be agents of hostile powers or
- they could deprive native-born workers of career opportunities.

However, there seems to be little doubt on either side of the aisle that as human capital has becomes more important to America’s success, the United States has a distinct need to attract highly skilled immigrants.

No other country has gained so much from global talent nor stands to do so in the future. Therefore, we must take the right steps to ensure that we get the mix of talent that benefits Americans the most, while minimizing risks.

If handled correctly, this is an area in which our political leaders can make meaningful near-term progress with enormous medium-to-long-term benefits.

Given this trend, we offer the following forecasts for your consideration.

First, policymakers will have to carefully manage and mitigate the risks to national security associated with highly skilled immigration. Obviously, researchers and students have been recruited to illicitly export IP, corporate secrets, research data, and other proprietary information. Foreign-born students have also been enlisted to conduct influence operations on campuses, including through Confucius Institutes. Such behavior threatens our security, compromises academic integrity and stifles campus speech. However, serious as these acts may be, they are perpetrated by a small number of bad actors, and they can be mitigated through effective and increasingly aggressive law enforcement, without resorting to blanket bans.

Second, over the coming decade a 50% increase in highly-skilled immigration will produce large benefits for Americans up and down the economic scale by boosting innovation and entrepreneurship. Critics warn, with good reason, that bringing in foreign workers can displace American citizens and limit their opportunities. However, as we’ve long-argued in Trends , highly skilled immigrants account for a small portion of annual migration, while the businesses and inventions they enable create a disproportionate share of American wealth and employment. Only 54,000 of the roughly one million individuals who were granted permanent resident status (with a green card) in 2019 were classified as skilled workers. Combined with the 85,000 temporary work visas allotted annually, we are looking at a very small percentage of the American workforce. This relatively small cohort cannot significantly displace American workers. And where they do, this modest harm can be addressed through targeted regulatory solutions. - Today, U.S. companies in many high-tech industries report a deficit of skilled workers. And research indicates that additions of highly-skilled migrants actually boosts employment for locals in most places by eliminating bottlenecks.

Third, despite political friction, U.S. policymakers will formulate a set of policies that will enable us to realize huge benefits from highly skilled immigration while minimizing ancillary damage. At this point, policymakers have a menu of options which are worthy of serious consideration. Here are just a few commonsense options intended to minimize risks and maximize benefits:

1. Policymakers could boost law enforcement’s investigative and enforcement resources related to IP theft and espionage. Universities could be specifically charged with doing their part by adhering to basic principles of academic freedom and transparency in funding sources. The Donald Trump administration rightly stepped-up enforcement and that policy needs to continue in the Biden administration.

2. Washington could establish a national security visa for vetted applicants who would work in fields related to the national security innovation base. This would not only incentivize top talent to contribute directly to America’s military and technological strength but also bolster the country’s ability to compete for global leadership in innovation. The idea has gained traction already, including through a provision in the 2020 National Defense Authorization Act. We should put the national security visa in place now and so we can quickly realize the benefits.

3. Policymakers can also reduce the applications backlog and remove arbitrary barriers that clog up the existing visa and green card processes by reducing delays, increasing application throughput, and ensuring process transparency. They should also be careful to reduce system abuse by domestic and foreign employers; the more complex the process, the more it hinders the free flow of talent and favors large, established employers over smaller firms which may need the talent more.

4. Policymakers could implement a set of modest reforms to increase opportunities for global talent to come to, work in, and stay in the United States. As a first step, Congress could boost caps on employment-based green cards, particularly for those at higher skill levels (such as the EB-1 or EB-2 classifications).

And it could shorten the time required to move from temporary work to permanent residency for certain occupations or skill levels. It could also remove limits on immigration from specific countries or regions while sup-porting applicants from countries that tend to send fewer migrants. Counterintuitively, immigrants from less common countries tend to innovate and start businesses at a disproportionately high rate.

5. Policymakers could also give priority to the socalled “heartland visa” designed to draw talent to non-coastal centers that need it most. This would help distribute human talent, and therefore capital, around the country to boost areas traditionally underserved by highly skilled immigration.

6. The government could offer long-term visas or even green cards to international students receiving advanced degrees in certain STEM fields. For example, in AI-related research, this would help the U.S. retain students and researchers and compete against our rivals’ talent strategies. Not every U.S.-educated foreigner will stay here, but it is unwise for U.S. universities to educate and train some of the world’s foremost engineers and scientists only to watch them leave not based on their own desire, but for lack of opportunities. And,

7. Policymakers could consider more fundamental changes to how the country manages access to this country, particularly for skilled global talent. One consideration is whether the visa and green card system, with numerical caps and opportunities for abuse, is the best way to attract and retain top talent. Another is finding ways to prioritize those with education or work experience in priority STEM areas. The United States could abandon numerical caps on visas and green cards or replace them with a standards-based model that welcomes all who meet certain criteria. Republican lawmakers have repeatedly proposed a points-based system that would prioritize migrants with certain skills, occupations, and educational backgrounds. More narrowly, the country could mandate that employment-based green cards apply only to workers and create a separate program for families to come, thereby allowing more workers to stay permanently. And,

Fourth, the United States will realize its full potential during the Golden Age of the Digital Revolution only if it implements a strategy for fostering homegrown talent and maximizing the opportunities for Americans to flourish. Any plan to embrace highly skilled immigration is but one component of a much-needed talent strategy to attract, retain, and educate the future workforce. Highly skilled immigrants, though valuable, are limited in number and impact. A true strategy to maximize American competitiveness would prioritize homegrown talent and maximize opportunities for Americans. It would provide greater funding, digital infrastructure, data access, and other resources to support STEM education at all levels. It would entail working with states, schools, and businesses on workforce development, job training, and continuing education. Most of all, it would prioritize reforming K-12 education. Too many children never get the opportunity to succeed due to the poor state of some of our schools. Ultimately, the work we must do at home on education, training, mobility, and equality of opportunity is more important and existential than promoting immigration. However, it is also much more complex and requires long-term solutions. In the meantime, we can-and should-address changes to highly skilled immigration policy, ASAP.

Resource List:
1. US Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. November 18, 2019. Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations. Threats to the U.S. Research Enterprise: China’s Talent Recruitment Plans.
https://www.hsgac.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/2019-11-18%20PSI%20Staff%20Report%20-%20China’s%20Talent%20Recruitment%20Plans%20Updated2.pdf

2. Bridgewater Associates. February 7, 2019. Greg Jensen et al. Peak Profit Margins? A US Perspective.
https://www.bridgewater.com/research-and-insights/peak-profit-margins-a-us-perspective

3. Georgetown University, School of Foreign Service, Center for Security and Emerging Technology. December 2019. Remco Zwetsloot et al. Keeping Top AI Talent in the United States: Findings and Policy Options for International Graduate Student Retention,
https://cset.georgetown.edu/research/keeping-top-ai-talent-in-the-united-states/

4. Compete America Coalition. May 2013. Gordon H. Hanson and Matthew J. Slaughter. Talent, Immigration, and U.S. Economic Competitiveness,
https://gps.ucsd.edu/_files/faculty/hanson/hanson_publication_immigration_talent.pdf

5. New American Economy. July 22, 2019. New American. Fortune 500 in 2019: Top American Companies and Their Immigrant Roots.
https://data.newamericaneconomy.org/en/fortune500-2019/

6. National Foundation for American Policy, October 2018. Stuart Anderson. Immigrants and Billion-Dollar Companies.
https://nfap.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/o1/2018-8ILLION-DOLLAR-STARTUPS.NFAP-Policy-Brief.2018-1.pdf

7. National Immigration Forum, July 11, 2018. Dan Kosten. Immigrants as Economic Contributors: Immigrant Entrepreneurs.
https://immigrationforum.org/article/immigrants-as-economic-contributors-immigrant-entrepreneurs/

8. National Bureau of Economic Research. January 2017. Ufuk Akcigit, John Grigsby, and Tom Nicholas.The Rise of American Ingenuity: Innovation and Inventors of the Golden Age.
https://www.nber.org/papers/w23o47

9. Stanford Graduate School of Business. November 6, 2018. Shai Bernstein et al. The Contribution of High-Skilled Immigrants to Innovation in the United States.
https://econ.tau.ac.il/sites/economy.tau.ac.il/files/media_server/Economics/PDF/seminars%202019-20/BDMP_2019.pdf

10. Harvard Business School. May 2019. William R. Kerr. The Gift of Global Talent: Innovation Policy and the Economy.
https://www.hbs.edu/faculty/Publication%20Files/!9-116_81a34674abbe-4dbo-9931-65bdb578c7ae.pdf

11. Catalyst. Spring 2016. Pia O J Tenius. Benefits of Immigration Outweigh the Costs.
https://www.bushcenter.org/catalyst/north-american-century/benefits-of-immigration-outweigh-costs.htmI

12. United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division, International Migration. May 27, 2019. Bernstein et al. The Contribution of High-Skilled Immigrants to Innovation in the United States.
https://econ.tau.ac.il/sites/economy.tau.ac.il/files/media_server/Economics/PDF/seminars%202019-20/BDMP_2019.pdf

13. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. February 2020. Rohen d’Aiglepierre et al. A Global Profile of Emigrants to OECD Countries: Younger and More Skilled Migrants from More Diverse Countries.
https://doi.org/10.1787/ocb305d3-en

14. Institute of lnternational Education. Center for Academic Mobility Research and Impact. Fall 2019. Jodie Sanger and Julie Baer. International Student Enrollment Snapshot Survey.
https://www.iie.org/-/media/Files/Corporate/Open-Doors/Fast-Facts/Fall-2019-SnapshotSurvey.ashx?la=en&hash=279D837D401849165C35224Do8B09D21593AD9FD

15. Georgetown University, School of Foreign Service, Center for Security and Emerging Technology. September 2019. Zachary Arnold et al. Immigration Policy and the U.S. AI Sector.
https://cset.georgetown.edu/research/immigration-policy-and-the-u-s-ai-sector/

16. Federal Bureau of Investigations. July 7, 2020. Christopher Wray. The Threat Posed by the Chinese Government and the Chinese Communist Party to the Economic and National Security of the United States.
https://www.fbi.gov/news/speeches/the-threat-posed-by-the-chinese-government-and-the-chinese-communist-party-to-the-economic-and-national-security-of-the-unitedstates

17. Hoover Institution. 2019. Larry Diamond and Orville Schell. China’s Influence & America’s Interests: Promoting Constructive Vigilance.
https://www.hoover.org/sites/default/files/research/docs/oo_diamond-schell-chinas-intluence-and-american-interests.pdf

18. Wall Street Journal. January 21, 2020. Kate O’Keeffe and Aruna Viswanatha. U.S. Turns Up the Spotlight on Chinese Universities.
https://www.wsj.com/articles/u-s-turns-up-the-spotlight-onchinese-universities-11579602787

19. American Compass. December 16, 2020. Oren Cass. Worker Power, Loose Borders: Pick One.
https://americancompass.org/the-commons/worker-power-loose-borders-pick-one/

20. Council on Foreign Relations. September 2019. James Manyika, William H. McRaven and Adam Segal. Innovation and National Security: Keeping Our Edge.
https://www.cfr.org/report/keeping-our-edge/pdf/TFR_Innovation_Strategy.pdf

21.Kansas City Stm. July 23, 2019. Ronald Reagan. Ronald Reagan: Immigrants Recognize the Intoxicating Power of America.
https://www.kansascity.com/opinion/opn-columns-blogs/syndicated-columnists/article232864812.html




글로벌 인재 확보 경쟁에서 승리하기

모든 혁신은 사람으로부터 비롯된다. 미국의 성공은 이러한 혁신을 이민자로부터 공급받아왔기 때문이다. 그러나 이제는 미국뿐만 아니라 OECD 국가들 모두 글로벌 인재를 확보하기 위해 경쟁에 뛰어들고 있다. 글로벌 인재 확보 경쟁에서 승리하려면 무엇을 해야 할 것인가?

사람의 창의성과 근면성은 항상 경제 활성화의 주요 원동력이자 국가 경쟁력의 핵심 요소였다. 세계 경제가 점점 더 디지털화되면서 오늘날의 경제는 물리적 장비 및 건물을 포함한 유형 자본에 대한 의존에서 무형 자본, 즉 주로 소프트웨어 및 특허 형태의 지적 자본을 의미하는 무형 자산으로 이동하고 있다. 인간의 재능은 이러한 무형 자산의 주요 원천이므로 경제 성장과 혁신에서 그 중요성은 당연히 점점 더 커지고 있다.

동시에 국가 안보와 국력은 그 어느 때보다 경제적, 기술적 성공에 달려 있다. 분명히 전쟁 무기는 첨단 기술에 점점 더 의존하고 있다. 그러나 더 중요한 것은 경제 전쟁이 21세기에는 국제적 경쟁의 주요 경기장이 되었고 기술 패권을 위한 경쟁은 이미 가장 치열한 전선을 형성하고 있다는 점이다.

인공 지능, 5G, 양자 과학과 같은 고급 기술 분야는 개발을 주도하는 국가의 보안 및 지정학적 위치에 결정적 이점을 제공할 수 있다. 결과적으로 미래의 기술과 기술 표준을 형성하는 국가는 막대한 이익을 얻게 될 것이다.

미국으로 온 고도로 숙련된 이민자들은 지난 100년 동안 과학 연구에서 탁월한 성과를 보였고,  STEM(과학, 기술, 공학, 수학) 분야에서 계속적으로 미국의 우위를 지켜오고 있다. 혁신의 과정에서 고급 기술 이민자들은 미국의 기업가 정신을 수용하여 놀라운 속도로 포춘 500대 기업을 비롯한 다양한 비즈니스를 일으켰다.

이들 이민자들이 주변을 더욱 혁신적으로 변모시키는 동시에 발명과 혁신의 주요 원천이 되었음은 이미 입증된 사실이다. 오늘날 미국의 이민자는 인구의 약 14%를 차지하며 이는 1950년의 약 7%에서 증가한 수치이다. 그리고 미국 전체 인구에 있어 이들이 차지하는 인구 비율 대비 이들의 소위 ‘글로벌 인재 풀’은 지속적으로 미국의 과학적 발견에 매우 큰 기여를 해오고 있다.

이러한 결과, 이민자 집단이 미국 연구 기관과 기술 분야를 거의 지배하고 있다. 예를 들어, 1901년 이래 미국 외부에서 태어난 연구원들이 미국 거주자에게 수여되는 화학, 의학, 물리학 노벨상의 3분의 1을 수상했다. 그리고 이들은 2000년 이후 미국 사회 곳곳에서 더욱 널리 퍼졌다.

또한 외국 학생들이 미국의 STEM 강의실을 채우고 있다. 예를 들어 인공지능 관련 분야 대학원생의 3분의 2가 해외에서 태어났다. 대학 교육을 받은 외국 태생 근로자는 또한 미국 태생 근로자보다 기술, 과학, 엔지니어링 직종에 고용될 가능성이 더 높다. 2013년에 다트머스 대학의 턱 경영대학원 학장 매튜 슬로터와 현 하버드 대학의 고든 핸슨 교수는 STEM 분야에서 일하는 STEM 박사 학위를 소지한 미국 인력의 60%가 이민자라는 사실을 발견했다. 그리고 컴퓨터 과학, 컴퓨터 프로그래밍, 소프트웨어 개발의 주요 STEM 분야에서 석사 학위를 가진 미국 인력의 50% 이상이 이민자였다.

결과적으로 미국은 혁신을 가능하게 하는 과학적 발견과 기술 연구를 발전시키기 위해 이민자들에게 그 어느 때보다 더 의존하고 있다!

외국 태생의 기업가들도 최고 수준의 비즈니스 영역에서 엄청난 기여를 했다. 2019년 기준, 포춘 500대 기업 중 20%가 이민자에 의해 만들어졌으며, 나머지 24%는 이민자 자녀가 그러했다. 레비 스트라우스(Levi Strauss)와 같은 미국의 아이콘부터 모스크바 태생의 세르게이 브린(Sergey Brin)이 공동 설립한 구글 등 실리콘 밸리의 위대한 기업에 이르기까지 이러한 기업들은 여러 분야와 부문에 걸쳐 있으며 이들 본사는 전국 곳곳에 위치해 있다.

또한 이민자들은 2018년에 가치가 10억 달러 이상인 비상장 스타트업 91개 중 50개를 창업했고, 그 총 가치는 무려 2,480억 달러에 이른다.

이민자들이 자신을 재능을 빛낸 곳은 대기업만이 아니다. 전국 중소기업의 18% 창업자는 외국 태생이다. 교육 수준이 낮은 이민자들이 가장 기업가적인 경향을 가지고 있으며, 최소한 대학 학위를 가진 이민자들은 여전히 ​​미국 태생의 이민자들보다 더 자주 새로운 사업을 시작하고 있다.

STEM 분야와 새로운 비즈니스 산업 부문에 이민자들이 널리 퍼지면서 이들은 미국 역사 전반에 걸쳐 발명과 혁신의 중요한 원천으로 자리 잡았다. 출원된 특허 수를 기준으로, 1880년부터 1940년까지 가장 독창적인 10개 국가는 가장 창의적이지 않는 10개 국가보다 거의 12배 많은 국제 이민자를 보유했다. 이들 국가에는 1인당 발명가 비율이 6배, 1인당 특허는 8배나 더 높았다. 스탠포드 경영대학원의 한 연구자에 따르면, 1976년부터 2012년까지 이민자는 미국 발명가의 16%, 신규 특허의 23%, 전체적인 혁신 창출의 30%를 차지했다.

이민과 혁신 사이의 관계는 이미 잘 확립된 사항이다. 하버드 경영대학원 윌리엄 커(William Kerr) 교수는 “고숙련 이민자는 분명히 미국 혁신의 필수적인 부분”이라고 밝혔다. 그리고 이들은 미국 내 주변에 이러한 혁신을 전파시켰다. 조지 W.부시 연구소(George W. Bush Institute)의 연구에서, 달라스 연방 준비 은행 부사장 피아 오레니우스(Pia Orrenius)는 “이민자들 사이에서 더 큰 혁신이 미국 내 원주민들 사이에서도 혁신을 촉진하는 것으로 보인다”고 말했다. 앞서 인용한 스탠포드 연구원들은 다음과 같이 말했다.

“이민자들이 미국 혁신에 기여한 것 중 2/3 이상이 이민자들이 미국 원주민을 훨씬 더 생산적으로 만드는 방식 때문이었다.”

이 모든 것은 숙련된 이민자들이 혁신의 구성 요소인 과학적 연구, 기술 개발, 비즈니스 구축 및 기업가 정신을 주도한다는 것을 의미한다. 이민자들이 이끈 이러한 혁신의 패턴은 한 세기가 넘는 기간 미국 경제 구성의 중심이었으며 이 가치는 단순한 경제적 측정치를 초과한다.

코로나 팬데믹 상황에 대한 국가적 대응에서 이보다 더 명확한 것은 없었다. 고도로 숙련된 이민자들은 의료와 생명공학 분야에서 주도적인 역할을 수행하고 있다. 그리고 최전선에 있는 의료진들은 외국 태생이 압도적으로 많다. 또한 코로나바이러스 백신 개발을 주도한 두 회사 모더나와 화이자는 이민자들이 설립한 기업이다.

결론은 무엇인가? 지식 기반 노동자와 기업가에 점점 더 의존하고 있는 경제에서 미국은 최고의 글로벌 인재를 유치하고 유지할 수 있는 능력을 적극적으로 보호하고 강화해야 한다는 것이다.

좋은 소식은 전 세계적으로 고도로 숙련된 이민자 풀이 확대되고 있다는 것이다. 지난 30년 동안 전 세계 이민자 인구는 1억 5,300만에서 2억 7,200만으로 증가했으며 교육 및 기술 수준은 훨씬 더 빠르게 증가했다. 구체적으로, 2000년부터 2015년까지 OECD 국가로 유입되는 최소 대학 교육을 받은 이민자의 수는 2천만 명이 증가한 반면 저학력 이민자의 수는 5백만 명 정도 증가했다.

미국에 있어 나쁜 소식은 다른 선진국들도 전 세계적인 인재 공급과 고도로 숙련된 이민자를 더 유치해야 할 필요성을 인식하고 있다는 것이다. 이들은 최고의 인재를 더 많이 유치하기 위한 조치를 취하고 있다.

인구 증가, 노동 공급 및 경제 확장을 보완하기 위해 오랫동안 이민자에 크게 의존해 온 국가들은 최근에는 하이테크 기술을 가진 사람들뿐만 아니라 더 많은 기업가들을 유치하기 위해 정책을 수정하고 있다.

예를 들어, 캐나다는 최근 캐나다 벤처 캐피털 회사 또는 기타 투자 그룹의 창업 자금으로 이민자에게 즉시 영주권 자격을 부여하는 창업 비자 프로그램을 통합했다.

호주도 이 대열에 가세했다. 최근 몇 년 동안 호주는 글로벌 인재를 유치하기 위해 새로운 프로그램을 시행했다. 여기에는 기업가적 아이디어와 첨단 기술을 갖춘 개인이 고용주 후원 없이 비자를 신청할 수 있도록 장려하는 프로그램과 시드스테이지 스타트업을 시작하기 위해 외국 기업가를 모집하는 프로그램이 포함된다.

독일 또한 이미 온건한 이민 정책으로 수정했고, 일본, 중국과 같이 역사적으로 제한적 정책을 펼친 국가들도 고도로 숙련된 이민을 지원하기 위해 입장을 완화하고 정책을 재정비했다.

이러한 맥락에서 미국은 최상위를 유지하는 데 필요한 엘리트 인적 자본을 항상 확보할 것이라고 가정해서는 곤란하다. 그러나 이러한 인재 유지를 위한 국제적 경쟁이 심화되고 있음에도 불구하고, 미 양당 행정부 모두 재능 있는 외국인에게 호소하고 이들을 지원하고 유지하기 위한 의미 있는 조치를 취하지 못했다.

오히려 미국은 그 반대 방향으로 갔다. 민주당은 미래의 정원사, 식품권 수혜자를 인정하는 데 더 관심이 있는 반면, 공화당은 종종 엔지니어와 컴퓨터 과학자를 인정하는 것과 잠재적인 패스트푸드 노동자를 인정하는 의미를 혼동했다. 그 결과 트럼프 시대에 미국은 가장 재능 있는 외국인 노동자와 학생들이 미국에 와서 미국에 머무르는 것을 더 어렵게 만드는 정책을 시행했다. 그리고 더 최근에는 바이든 행정부가 주로 저숙련 이민자들을 중심으로 하는 제한적 이민 정책을 철회하겠다고 약속했고, 미국 내 일자리를 현재의 미국 태생으로 채우는 데만 골몰하고 있다. 즉, 바이든 행정부는 세계 최고의 두뇌를 미국으로 모집하고 그들을 유지하기 위해 무엇을 할 것인지 현재 불분명하다.

이러한 추세를 완전히 이해하려면 글로벌 인재에 대한 미국의 상대적 매력은 다음과 같은 요소들이 포함된 여러 요인으로 구성된다는 점을 이해하는 것이 중요하다.

- 글로벌 경쟁
- 미국의 이민 정책
- 광범위한 국내 문화 동향
- 혁신, 노동, 기업가 정신과 관련된 미국 내 정책.

이러한 다양한 요소를 종합적으로 분석하는 것은 어렵지만, 몇 가지만 피상적으로 검토해도 우려스러운 경향이 드러나고 있다.

첫째, 고도로 숙련된 이민자들의 이민 신청이 증가함에도 불구하고 교육을 받고 전문화된 근로자를 위한 H-1B 비자와 I-485 고용 기반 영주권의 한도는 1990년 이후 크게 변하지 않았다. 한도는 2004년에 65,000개로 설정되었으며 의회는 미국 대학에서 고급 학위를 받는 사람을 위해 20,000개의 추가 비자를 승인했다. 이러한 엄격한 제한으로 인해 신규 및 기존 임시 취업 비자에 대한 거부율이 최근 몇 년 동안 증가했고 고용 기반 영구 거주를 원하는 이민자의 ‘거부’ 및 ‘보류’ 상태도 증가했다. 2015년부터 2019년까지 새로운 H-1B 비자 신청 거부율은 약 6%에서 20% 이상으로 급증했다. 계속 고용을 위한 청원 거부 비율도 3%에서 거의 12%로 증가했다. 영주권 신청자들도 마찬가지로 훨씬 더 높은 비율로 청원이 거부되거나 지연되었다.

둘째, 정책 및 규제 변경으로 인해 비자 및 영주권 신청 절차가 더 어려워진 것으로 보이다. 고용 기반 영주권 신청 처리 시간은 지난 4년 동안 6.8개월에서 14개월 이상으로 두 배 이상 증가했다. 이러한 처리 시간의 급증은 기업의 고용 및 교육 능력을 저해하고 미국 대학의 유학생 등록을 방해했다. 더 간단히 말하자면, 정책 및 규제 변경은 외국의 두뇌들이 미국에 와서 일하고 머무르는 것을 더 고통스럽게 만들었다.

셋째, 미국 내 높은 장벽과 함께 다른 OECD 국가의 글로벌 인재 유치 경쟁이 심화되면서 미국 대학이 최고의 유학생을 유치할 수 있는 능력이 감소하고 있다. 2019년에는 대부분의 미국 학교들이 신규 유학생 수가 감소했다고 보고했다. 이 하락은 연속적인 하락세에 따른 것이다. 국제 교육 연구소(Institute of International Education)에 따르면 신규 유학생 등록은 2016년 3.3%, 2017년 6.6%, 2018년 0.9% 감소했습니다. 코로나 팬데믹이 모집 및 등록에 미치는 장기적 영향은 여전히 ​​남아 있지만, 단기적으로 이러한 팬데믹이 유학생을 더욱 감소시켰다. 전체적으로 미국의 유학생 비율은 2001년 28%에서 2019년 21%로 최근 몇 년 동안 감소해오고 있다.

동시에 중국의 점유율은 3%에서 9%로 증가했으며 호주와 캐나다는 더 높은 비율을 차지했다.

비자 및 영주권 승인을 금지하는 구체적인 규칙 변경과 함께 정책 불확실성 및 반이민 정서 증가의 증거는 냉담한 효과를 가져왔다. 저명한 기술자, 경영진, 학자들은 미국이 인재에 대한 경쟁력을 잃어가고 있다고 우려하고 있다. 이것은 미국이 글로벌 인재 경쟁에서 최고의 자리를 잃는다는 의미에 그치지 않는다. 100만 명이 넘는 유학생이 등록한 전 세계 유학생 중 가장 큰 비중을 차지하고 있으며 모든 면에서 일자리와 기회를 찾는 사람들에게 최고의 목적지로 남아 있었던 미국이 주도권을 잃고 있다는 분명한 경고 신호가 울리고 있다.

이 경고 신호는 ‘미국이 우승팀을 유지하기 위해 할 수 있는 모든 일을 하고 있습니까?’라는 질문을 던진다.

이민에 대한 광범위한 토론은 합의와 발전에 장애물로 작용한 복잡한 경제, 안보, 정치 및 문화적 고려 사항으로 가득 차 있다. 그리고 고숙련 외국인의 입학과 관련하여 가장 큰 두 가지 문제는 ‘그들을 적대 세력의 대리인으로 보거나, 그들이 미국 내 토박이 노동자의 취업 및 경력 기회를 박탈할 수 있다’는 인식이다.

그러나 인적 자본이 미국의 성공에 더 중요해짐에 따라 미국은 고도로 숙련된 이민자를 유치해야 할 분명한 필요성이 있다는 사실은 의심의 여지가 없는 것이다.

다른 어떤 국가도 미국만큼 글로벌 인재로부터 그렇게 많은 것을 얻었고 앞으로도 그렇게 할 수는 없을 것이다. 그러므로 미국은 위험을 최소화하면서 미국인들에게 가장 많은 혜택을 주는 인재들을 확보하기 위해 올바른 조치를 시급하게 취해야 한다. 제대로 처리된다면 미국에 엄청난 중장기적 이익을, 단기적으로는 상당한 성과를 이룰 수 있는 영역이기 때문이다.

이러한 추세를 감안할 때 우리는 다음과 같은 예측을 내려 본다.

첫째, 정책 입안자들은 고도로 숙련된 이민과 관련된 국가 안보에 대한 위험을 주의 깊게 관리하고 완화해야 한다.

외국 출신의 연구원과 유학생은 자의나 타의로 IP, 기업 비밀, 연구 데이터 및 기타 독점 정보를 불법으로 내보낼 수 있을 것이다. 이러한 행동은 당연히 보안을 위협하고 학업의 순수성을 훼손시키는 행위이다. 그러나 이러한 행위는 소수에 불과하기에, 인재를 유입하는 데 방해가 되는 전면적 금지에 의존하지 않고도 효과적이고 좀 더 공격적인 법 집행을 통해 충분히 완화할 수 있다. 빈대 잡으려다 초가 삼간을 태우는 우를 범해서는 안 된다.

둘째, 향후 10년 동안 고도로 숙련된 이민의 50% 증가는 혁신과 기업가 정신을 촉진함으로써 경제적 규모의 위아래에서 미국에 큰 혜택을 안겨줄 것이다.

비평가들은 외국인 노동자를 고용하는 것이 미국 시민을 추방하고 기회를 제한할 수 있다고 경고한다. 그러나 미국의 발전 역사를 오래 추적한 결과 고도로 숙련된 이민자들은 연간 이민의 작은 부분을 차지하면서도 그들이 이룬 사업과 발명은 미국의 부와 고용에 있어 상당한 부분을 창출한 것으로 나타났다. 2019년에 그린카드를 포함하는 영주권을 부여받은 약 100만 명 중 54,000명만이 숙련 노동자로 분류되었다. 연간 할당되는 85,000개의 임시 취업 비자와 함께 이는 미국 노동력의 아주 작은 비율이다. 이 상대적으로 작은 집단은 미국 노동자를 크게 대체할 수 없다. 그리고 만약 그러한 부문에서 발생하는 경미한 피해는 표적 규제 솔루션을 통해 해결할 수 있다. 핵심은 오늘날 수많은 하이테크 산업에 몸담고 있는 미국 기업들이 숙련 노동자 부족의 고통을 호소하고 있다는 점이다. 연구에 따르면 고도로 숙련된 이민자를 추가하면 병목 현상이 제거되어 대부분의 지역에서 실제로 현지인의 고용도 증가하는 것으로 나타났다.

셋째, 정치적 마찰에도 불구하고 미국 정책 입안자들은 미국 내 부수적 피해를 최소화하면서 고도로 숙련된 이민으로부터 막대한 이익을 실현할 수 있는 일련의 정책을 공식화할 것이다.

정책 입안자들은 진지하게 고려할 가치가 있는 옵션 메뉴를 가지고 있다. 다음은 위험을 최소화하고 이점을 극대화하기 위한 몇 가지 상식적인 옵션이다.

1. 정책 입안자는 IP 해킹, 간첩 행위와 관련된 법 집행 기관의 조사 및 집행 자원을 강화할 수 있다. 대학에게는 학문적 자유와 자금 출처의 투명성이라는 기본 원칙을 고수함으로써 그 역할을 수행할 책임을 구체적으로 부과할 수 있다.

2. 워싱턴은 국가 안보 혁신 기반과 관련된 분야에서 일할 검증된 지원자를 위해 국가 안보 비자를 설정할 수 있다. 이는 최고의 인재가 미국의 군사 및 기술 역량에 직접적으로 기여하도록 장려할 뿐만 아니라 혁신 분야에서 글로벌 리더십을 위해 경쟁할 수 있는 국가의 능력을 강화할 것이다.

3. 정책 입안자는 또한 지연을 줄이고, 신청 처리량을 늘리고, 절차의 투명성을 보장함으로써 신청 백로그를 줄이고 기존 비자 및 영주권 절차를 방해하는 임의의 장벽을 제거할 수 있다.

4. 정책 입안자는 글로벌 인재가 미국에 와서 일하고 체류할 수 있는 기회를 늘리기 위해 일련의 개혁을 시행할 수 있다. 첫 번째 단계로, 의회는 고용 기반 영주권, 특히 EB-1 또는 EB-2 분류와 같은 더 높은 기술 수준을 가진 사람들을 위해 한도를 높일 수 있다. 그리고 특정 직업이나 기술 수준에서 임시직에서 영주권으로 이동하는 데 필요한 시간을 단축할 수 있다. 또한 이민을 다소 억제하는 경향이 있는 국가의 이민 지원자를 돕기 위해 특정 국가 또는 지역의 이민 제한을 제거할 수 있다.

5. 정책 입안자들은 또한 인재를 가장 필요로 하는 곳에 인재를 끌어오기 위해 고안된 소위 ‘하트랜드 비자(heartland visa)’에 우선권을 줄 수 있다. 이것은 인적 재능, 따라서 자본을 전국적으로 분배하여 전통적으로 고도로 숙련된 이민에 의해 소외된 지역을 부양하는 데 도움이 될 것이다.

6. 정부는 특정 STEM 분야에서 고급 학위를 취득한 유학생에게 장기 비자 또는 영주권을 제공할 수 있다. 예를 들어, AI 관련 연구에서 이러한 조치는 미국이 학생과 연구원을 유지하고 라이벌 국가들의 인재 유치 전략과 경쟁하는 데 도움이 될 것이다. 미국에서 교육을 받은 외국인들이 모두 미국에 머물지는 않겠지만 미국 대학에서 세계 최고의 엔지니어와 과학자를 교육하고 훈련시켜 그들이 기회 부족으로 떠나는 것을 지켜보는 것은 현명하지 않다.

7. 정책 입안자들은 특히 숙련된 글로벌 인재를 위해 정부가 이민을 관리하는 기존 방식에 대한 보다 근본적인 변화를 고려할 수 있다. 한 가지 고려 사항은 숫자 제한과 남용 기회가 있는 비자 및 영주권 시스템이 최고의 인재를 유치하고 유지하는 가장 좋은 방법인지 여부이다. 다른 하나는 우선 순위 STEM 영역에서 교육 또는 업무 경험이 있는 사람들을 우선시하는 방법을 찾는 것이다. 미국은 비자와 영주권의 숫자 상한선을 포기하거나 특정 기준을 충족하는 모든 사람을 환영하는 표준 기반 모델로 대체할 수 있다. 공화당 의원들은 특정 기술, 직업 및 교육 배경을 가진 이민자를 우선시하는 점수 기반 시스템을 반복적으로 제안했다. 더 좁게는 고용 기반 그린카드가 노동자에게만 적용되도록 의무화하고 가족이 올 수 있는 별도의 프로그램을 만들어 더 많은 노동자들이 미국에 영구적으로 머물 수 있도록 할 수 있다.

넷째, 미국은 국내 인재를 육성하고 미국인이 번영할 수 있는 기회를 극대화하는 전략을 실행해야만 디지털 혁명의 황금기에 그 잠재력을 최대한 실현할 수 있을 것이다.

고도로 숙련된 이민을 수용하려는 모든 계획은 미래 인력을 유치, 유지 및 교육하기 위해 꼭 필요한 인재 전략의 한 구성 요소일 뿐이다. 고도로 숙련된 이민자들은 가치가 있지만 그 수와 영향력은 제한적이다. 이에 경쟁력을 극대화하기 위한 진정한 전략은 국내 인재를 우선시하고 이들에게 제공할 기회를 극대화하는 것이다. 모든 수준에서 STEM 교육을 지원하기 위해 더 많은 자금, 디지털 인프라, 데이터 액세스 및 기타 리소스를 제공해야 할 것이다. 노동력 개발, 직업 훈련, 평생 교육에 대해 주, 학교, 기업이 함께 협력해야 한다. 여기에는 교육 개혁도 중요하다. 일부 학교의 경우 열악한 상황으로 너무 많은 아이들이 성공할 기회를 얻지 못하고 있다. 궁극적으로 교육, 훈련, 이동성 및 기회의 평등에 관해 내부적인 정비를 마쳐야 한다. 이는 어떻게 보면 이민을 촉진하는 것보다 더 중요하고 실존적인 문제이다. 다만 이는 훨씬 더 복잡하고 장기적인 솔루션이 필요한 것이다. 그 동안 고도로 숙련된 이민 정책에 대한 변경 사항을 최대한 빨리 해결해야 한다.

Resource List:
1. US Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. November 18, 2019. Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations. Threats to the U.S. Research Enterprise: China’s Talent Recruitment Plans.
https://www.hsgac.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/2019-11-18%20PSI%20Staff%20Report%20-%20China’s%20Talent%20Recruitment%20Plans%20Updated2.pdf

2. Bridgewater Associates. February 7, 2019. Greg Jensen et al. Peak Profit Margins? A US Perspective.
https://www.bridgewater.com/research-and-insights/peak-profit-margins-a-us-perspective

3. Georgetown University, School of Foreign Service, Center for Security and Emerging Technology. December 2019. Remco Zwetsloot et al. Keeping Top AI Talent in the United States: Findings and Policy Options for International Graduate Student Retention,
https://cset.georgetown.edu/research/keeping-top-ai-talent-in-the-united-states/

4. Compete America Coalition. May 2013. Gordon H. Hanson and Matthew J. Slaughter. Talent, Immigration, and U.S. Economic Competitiveness,
https://gps.ucsd.edu/_files/faculty/hanson/hanson_publication_immigration_talent.pdf

5. New American Economy. July 22, 2019. New American. Fortune 500 in 2019: Top American Companies and Their Immigrant Roots.
https://data.newamericaneconomy.org/en/fortune500-2019/

6. National Foundation for American Policy, October 2018. Stuart Anderson. Immigrants and Billion-Dollar Companies.
https://nfap.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/o1/2018-8ILLION-DOLLAR-STARTUPS.NFAP-Policy-Brief.2018-1.pdf

7. National Immigration Forum, July 11, 2018. Dan Kosten. Immigrants as Economic Contributors: Immigrant Entrepreneurs.
https://immigrationforum.org/article/immigrants-as-economic-contributors-immigrant-entrepreneurs/

8. National Bureau of Economic Research. January 2017. Ufuk Akcigit, John Grigsby, and Tom Nicholas.The Rise of American Ingenuity: Innovation and Inventors of the Golden Age.
https://www.nber.org/papers/w23o47

9. Stanford Graduate School of Business. November 6, 2018. Shai Bernstein et al. The Contribution of High-Skilled Immigrants to Innovation in the United States.
https://econ.tau.ac.il/sites/economy.tau.ac.il/files/media_server/Economics/PDF/seminars%202019-20/BDMP_2019.pdf

10. Harvard Business School. May 2019. William R. Kerr. The Gift of Global Talent: Innovation Policy and the Economy.
https://www.hbs.edu/faculty/Publication%20Files/!9-116_81a34674abbe-4dbo-9931-65bdb578c7ae.pdf

11. Catalyst. Spring 2016. Pia O J Tenius. Benefits of Immigration Outweigh the Costs.
https://www.bushcenter.org/catalyst/north-american-century/benefits-of-immigration-outweigh-costs.htmI

12. United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division, International Migration. May 27, 2019. Bernstein et al. The Contribution of High-Skilled Immigrants to Innovation in the United States.
https://econ.tau.ac.il/sites/economy.tau.ac.il/files/media_server/Economics/PDF/seminars%202019-20/BDMP_2019.pdf

13. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. February 2020. Rohen d’Aiglepierre et al. A Global Profile of Emigrants to OECD Countries: Younger and More Skilled Migrants from More Diverse Countries.
https://doi.org/10.1787/ocb305d3-en

14. Institute of lnternational Education. Center for Academic Mobility Research and Impact. Fall 2019. Jodie Sanger and Julie Baer. International Student Enrollment Snapshot Survey.
https://www.iie.org/-/media/Files/Corporate/Open-Doors/Fast-Facts/Fall-2019-SnapshotSurvey.ashx?la=en&hash=279D837D401849165C35224Do8B09D21593AD9FD

15. Georgetown University, School of Foreign Service, Center for Security and Emerging Technology. September 2019. Zachary Arnold et al. Immigration Policy and the U.S. AI Sector.
https://cset.georgetown.edu/research/immigration-policy-and-the-u-s-ai-sector/

16. Federal Bureau of Investigations. July 7, 2020. Christopher Wray. The Threat Posed by the Chinese Government and the Chinese Communist Party to the Economic and National Security of the United States.
https://www.fbi.gov/news/speeches/the-threat-posed-by-the-chinese-government-and-the-chinese-communist-party-to-the-economic-and-national-security-of-the-unitedstates

17. Hoover Institution. 2019. Larry Diamond and Orville Schell. China’s Influence & America’s Interests: Promoting Constructive Vigilance.
https://www.hoover.org/sites/default/files/research/docs/oo_diamond-schell-chinas-intluence-and-american-interests.pdf

18. Wall Street Journal. January 21, 2020. Kate O’Keeffe and Aruna Viswanatha. U.S. Turns Up the Spotlight on Chinese Universities.
https://www.wsj.com/articles/u-s-turns-up-the-spotlight-onchinese-universities-11579602787

19. American Compass. December 16, 2020. Oren Cass. Worker Power, Loose Borders: Pick One.
https://americancompass.org/the-commons/worker-power-loose-borders-pick-one/

20. Council on Foreign Relations. September 2019. James Manyika, William H. McRaven and Adam Segal. Innovation and National Security: Keeping Our Edge.
https://www.cfr.org/report/keeping-our-edge/pdf/TFR_Innovation_Strategy.pdf

21.Kansas City Stm. July 23, 2019. Ronald Reagan. Ronald Reagan: Immigrants Recognize the Intoxicating Power of America.
https://www.kansascity.com/opinion/opn-columns-blogs/syndicated-columnists/article232864812.html

이전

목록